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Sick Girl (Masters of Horror) – Review

Sick Girl (Masters of Horror) – Review

Oct 8, 2012

reviewed by Skot
directed by Lucky McKee, 2006
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Sick Girl is the name of an episode of the generally strong Masters of Horror television series from the Showtime cable network.  It aired originally on January 13, 2006. Sick Girl is another bizarre contribution from the creative teamwork of Lucky McKee and Angela Bettis.  Bettis is the star.  McKee is the writer and director.  Their previous two projects, the feature films May and Roman, are twisted stories of loneliness and alienation, themes found here as well.  Roman is extremely brutal emotionally with very little lightness to it, but May reveals their capacity for dark humor as well.  Sick Girl definitely plays for the humor.

Bettis plays Ida Teeter, an entomologist who has a habit of taking her work home with her.  Having an apartment filled with six-legged zoological specimens has a dampening effect on her love life.  Max Grubb, her fellow scientist, tells her that her job is the reason that she keep faltering romantically.  Ida likes girls and she has trouble because the dates she brings home are creeped out by the “bug thing.”  She has to choose between the babes or the bugs according to Max.

Another source of tension in the story is Ida’s boarding house landlady, Lana Beasley, who objects to Ida keeping live specimens in the house.  She’s afraid for the health and safety of her granddaughter, Betty, who continuously wears a ladybug costume.  Ida tries to assuage Lana’s fears.  “I promise you,” she says.  “My pets will never cause any trouble.”  Famous last words.

One day, Ida receives a mysterious package in the mail from Brazil that contains a huge unidentified insect. Shortly after its arrival, the mystery bug manages to escape from its container.  Later, Ida receives an anonymous letter warning her that the insect she received is dangerous, presumably from the same person who sent the critter in the first place.  The claims the letter makes about the insect’s habits are most extraordinary.  Max just laughs it off.

Meanwhile, lovelorn Ida is attracted to a hippie girl whom she sees drawing pictures of fairies on a sketchpad in the lobby of the building where she works.  After building up the courage to talk to the hippie girl, Ida learns that her name is Misty Falls.  Ida is instantly smitten.  “She’s the bee’s knees,” she tells Max.

When Ida brings Misty home for an evening of amore’, she hides all her pets in her bedroom because she’s worried about how Misty will react.  After an awkward evening, the two begin to become intimate on the living room couch, during which time the escaped exotic bug bites Misty in the ear.  As we know, this critter has unusual properties.  Misty starts immediately to feel unwell, a fact she tries to keep from Ida.  Misty begins to experience some kind of transformation.  You’ll have to see what happens for yourself.

The Masters of Horror episodes are hit-or-miss.  Most of them are pretty strong, just as you’d expect given the talented directors they draw from.  McKee and Bettis have a knack for bringing out the humor in horror without forgetting that the point of a horror picture is to scare and repulse.  This short film is a nice relief from the weightier works we’ve seen from them before, while incorporating the familiar themes of solitude and lovesickness they handle so well.  McKee, as a writer, definitely likes to explore boundary transgressions of the human body in his artwork.  The monstrous reveal at the end has hints of Cronenberg’s The Fly. Angela Bettis has the weird lonely girl role down pat.  I’m not usually a big fan of horror humor but this piece has enough weirdness to keep my interest.

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